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Monday, 19 September

17:00

15 Unexpected Wallpapers for Fall "IndyWatch Feed Diy"

15 Unexpected Wallpapers for Fall

Whenever fall rolls around, I turn my sights from outdoor house work back to indoor projects. I’ve been wanting to redo our mudroom/entryway (slides 5-7) for a while, so I’ve been slowly collecting wallpaper samples and paint chips to give the space a little energy and color. The rest of our house is pretty calming and neutral, but I’ve always loved the idea of an entryway being a little bit snazzier so it sends you out into the world with some pep in your step.

I’ve been deep-diving into wallpaper books and online galleries for the past few months and wanted to share 15 of my favorite unexpected wallpapers. Some of these designs are a little eccentric or out there (a wall that looks like it’s covered in tiny stamps? Why not?), but I think sometimes small spaces are perfect for a pattern like that. I hope you’ll enjoy these designs as much as I do. xo, grace

16:00

Design*Sponge Book Tour: Austin, TX! "IndyWatch Feed Diy"

itcow_booktour_promos_cities_austin

I’m so excited to announce the details of our In the Company of Women book tour stop in Austin, Texas! On Friday, October 7th, I’ll be moderating an amazing panel with an incredible group of local women as part of the Texas Book Festival!

I’ll be joined on stage by Nikisha Brunson of Urban Bush Babes and Folie ApothecaryNorma Jeanne Maloney of Red Rider Studios, Ashley and Christina Cheng of SPUN Ice CreamNatalie Davis of Canoe and Kirsten Dickerson of Raven + LilyWe’ll be talking about life, work and and everything in between. They’ll be sharing so much wisdom and inspiration, you won’t want to miss this talk!

GET YOUR TICKETS HERE! (Thank you Book People and Texas Monthly for your support with this event)

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15:00

How to Design a Microcontroller Circuit "IndyWatch Feed Diy"

HeroImageThis article will focus primarily on the circuit design considerations of incorporating an ARM Cortex-M microcontroller.

Read more on MAKE

The post How to Design a Microcontroller Circuit appeared first on Make: DIY Projects and Ideas for Makers.

14:00

Build Props and Costume Armor with Paper, Pepakura, and Bondo "IndyWatch Feed Diy"

FIGURE 2-36: Making the paper shinyYou don't need fancy digital fabrication tools to make high quality props, you just need some paper, a pepakura program, and some Bondo and resin.

Read more on MAKE

The post Build Props and Costume Armor with Paper, Pepakura, and Bondo appeared first on Make: DIY Projects and Ideas for Makers.

04:49

A freshly weeded Farmers’ Market junk flower bed. For now. "IndyWatch Feed Diy"

farmers-market-sign-in-a-flower-bed-001You guys… I did something totally spontaneous this past weekend, that I cannot wait to blog about! I even bought another point and shoot camera for the trip (after having lost my last one on our Hawaiian vacay). I needed some mountain time before fall hit hard, so I head for the hills for a […]

The post A freshly weeded Farmers’ Market junk flower bed. For now. appeared first on Funky Junk Interiors.

01:42

Best Places to Live with Minimal Building Codes: Idaho County "IndyWatch Feed Diy"

Idaho County has no building codes, just septic and electric permits needed

Idaho County has no building codes, just septic and electric permits needed


I’ve been planning a series of articles on the best places to live in North America that have few or no building codes — places that are ideal for homesteaders to build their sustainable home out of natural materials. I’m asking readers to send us their recommendations. Today’s article is the first installment of the series.

Building codes are a huge concern because they unnecessarily raise the cost of construction about ten-fold. That means a simple cabin made of locally available natural materials that could be built for $10,000 could end up costing $100,000 in areas with lots of building codes. The difference in cost goes to enrich building suppliers, big corporations and bloated government. Take your choice. I say no way. Move to an area with minimal building codes and taste true freedom. See: Counties with Few or No Building Codes

Today’s story is from Charlotte who writes to say, “Take a look at Idaho County (8,500 square miles), Idaho which is not far from Montana. No building codes, just septic and electric permits needed. I live 20 minutes from the nearest town. Bare land is about $10,000/acre. And it’s only cold in the winter. :) Plus, we have four seasons.”

From Wiki: As of the 2010 United States Census, there were 16,267 people, 6,834 households, and 4,536 families residing in the county. The population density was 1.9 inhabitants per square mile (0.73/km2). The county seat is Grangeville.

There are 4,431,720 acres (17,934.535 km², or 6,924.563 sq mi) of National Forest land within the county, more than in any county (or borough) outside of Alaska. National Forests and their acreage within the county are: Nez Perce National Forest 2,224,091; Clearwater National Forest 870,807; Payette National Forest 804,853; Bitterroot National Forest 464,108; Salmon National Forest 66,074; and Wallowa National Forest 1,787. The Nez Perce National Forest is located entirely within the county’s borders, and is the largest National Forest lying within a single county.

The median income for a household in the county was $34,536 and the median income for a family was $39,263.

Cities: Cottonwood, Elk City, Ferdinand, Grangeville, Kooskia, Riggins, Stites, White Bird

Wiki
Official Idaho County website
Image source: Black Swan Development (you can search their property listings by city)

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Sunday, 18 September

22:35

02:02

Primitive Technology: Barrel Tiled Shed "IndyWatch Feed Diy"


“I built a tiled roof shed to provide a fire and rain proof shelter for working on projects during wet weather and for storing firewood. The shed houses the very kiln used to fire its own tiles.

I cut timber using the stone hatchet and took it to the building site. 6 Upright posts were stuck into the ground about half a meter. Mortises were cut into the horizontal beams using a stone chisel to start with, then had there mortices enlarged using hot coals and a blow pipe to burn them out more. These beams were put in place and rafters were lashed on with lawyer cane. The wood that the tiles sit on are about 50 cm apart. The finished frame was 2 x 2 m in floor plan, 2 m tall at the ridge line and 1.5 m tall at the sides. This roof angle is about 22.5 degrees, half the pitch of the huts I usually make. This took about a week but I did it about 4 months ago and left the wood at the site because I was busy on other videos”

YouTube
A reader the other day asked me about low cost roofing options. Here you go. The guy in the video did everything by hand with crude tools. It would be easy to greatly speed up the process by buying a truckload of clay (good quality clay requires no mixing), using better tools, etc. Fired clay roofing tiles can last many decades as you can see all across Europe, etc. Of course you could invest in micro concrete roofing (MCR) tile machines. They have lots of advantages such as uniformity and lightweight. But as you can see the old fashioned way still works if you have lots of time.

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